Bankruptcy Tax Guide ::

Determination of Tax

The first step in the determination of the tax due is filing a return. As an individual bankrupt debtor, you file a Form 1040 for the tax year involved, and the trustee of your bankruptcy estate files a Form 1041, as explained earlier under Individuals in Chapter 7 or 11. A bankrupt corporation, or a receiver, bankruptcy trustee, or assignee having possession of, or holding title to, substantially all the property or business of the corporation, files a Form 1120 for the tax year.

After the return is filed, the Internal Revenue Service may redetermine the tax liability shown on the return. When the administrative remedies within the Service have been exhausted, the tax issue may be litigated either in the bankruptcy court or in the U.S. Tax Court, as explained in the following discussion.

Request for prompt determination of tax liability by the trustee. The trustee of the bankruptcy estate may request a determination of any unpaid liability of the estate for tax incurred during the administration of the case by the filing of a tax return and a request for such a determination with the Internal Revenue Service. Unless the return is fraudulent or contains a material misrepresentation, the trustee, the debtor, and any successor to the debtor are discharged from liability for the tax upon payment of the tax:

  1. As determined by the Internal Revenue Service,
  2. As determined by the bankruptcy court, after the completion of the IRS examination, or
  3. As shown on the return, if the IRS does not:
    1. Notify the trustee within 60 days after the request for the determination that the return has been selected for examination, or
    2. Complete the examination and notify the trustee of any tax due within 180 days after the request (or any additional time permitted by the bankruptcy court).

Making the request for determination. To request a prompt determination of any unpaid tax liability of the estate, the trustee must file a written application for the determination with the IRS District Director for the district in which the bankruptcy case is pending. The application must be submitted in duplicate and executed under the penalties of perjury. The trustee must submit with the application an exact copy of the return (or returns) filed by the trustee with the IRS for a completed tax period, and a statement of the name and location of the office where the return was filed. On the envelope write ‘‘Personal Attention of the Special Procedures Function. DO NOT OPEN IN MAILROOM.’’

The IRS examination function will notify the trustee within 60 days from receipt of the application whether the return filed by the trustee has been selected for examination or has been accepted as filed. If the return is selected for examination, it will be examined as soon as possible. The examination function will notify the trustee of any tax due within 180 days from receipt of the application or within any additional time permitted by the bankruptcy court.

Bankruptcy court jurisdiction. Generally, the bankruptcy court has authority to determine the amount or legality of any tax imposed on the debtor or the estate, including any fine, penalty, or addition to tax, whether or not the tax was previously assessed or paid.

The bankruptcy court does not have authority to determine the amount or legality of a tax, fine, penalty, or addition to tax that was contested before and finally decided by a court or administrative tribunal of competent jurisdiction (that became res judicata) before the date of filing the bankruptcy petition.

Also, the bankruptcy court does not have authority to decide the right of the bankruptcy estate to a tax refund until the trustee of the estate properly requests the refund from the Internal Revenue Service and either the Service determines the refund or 120 days pass after the date of the request.

If you (the debtor) have already claimed a refund or credit for an overpayment of tax on a properly filed return or claim for refund, the trustee may rely on that claim. Otherwise, if the credit or refund was not claimed by you, the trustee may make the request by filing the appropriate original or amended return or form with the District Director for the district in which the bankruptcy case is pending. On the return or claim for refund write ‘‘Personal Attention of the Special Procedures Function. DO NOT OPEN IN MAILROOM.’’

The appropriate form for the trustee to use in making the claim for refund is as follows:

  1. For income taxes for which an individual debtor had filed a Form 1040, Form 1040A, or Form 1040EZ, the trustee should use a Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return.
  2. For income taxes for which a corporate debtor had filed a Form 1120, the trustee should use a Form 1120X, Amended U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return.
  3. For income taxes for which a debtor had filed a form other than Form 1040, Form 1040A, Form 1040EZ, or Form 1120, the trustee should use the same type of form that the debtor had originally filed, and write ‘‘Amended Return’’ at the top of the form.
  4. For taxes other than certain excise taxes or income taxes for which the debtor had filed a return, the trustee should use a Form 843, Claim for Refund and Request for Abatement, attaching an exact copy of any return that is the subject of the claim along with a statement of the name and location of the office where the return was filed.
  5. For excise taxes you reported on Forms 720, 730, or 2290, the trustee should use Form 8849, Claim for Refund of Excise Taxes or Schedule C of Form 720, whichever is appropriate.
  6. For overpayment of taxes of the bankruptcy estate incurred during the administration of the case, the trustee may choose to use a properly executed tax return (for income taxes, a Form 1041) as a claim for refund or credit.

The IRS examination function, if requested by the trustee or debtor-in-possession as discussed later, will examine the appropriate amended return, claim, or original return filed by the trustee on an expedite basis, and will complete the examination and notify the trustee of its decision within 120 days from the date of filing of the claim.

Tax Court jurisdiction. The filing of a bankruptcy petition automatically results in a stay (suspension) of any U.S. Tax Court proceeding to determine your tax liability as the debtor. This stay continues until one of the acts removing it occurs. The stay may be lifted by the bankruptcy court upon your request, the request of the IRS, or the request of any other party in interest. Because the bankruptcy court has power to lift the stay and allow you to begin or continue a Tax Court case involving your tax liability, the bankruptcy court has, in effect, during the pendency of the stay, the sole authority to determine whether the tax issue is decided in the bankruptcy court itself or in the Tax Court.

Suspension of time for filing. In any bankruptcy case, the 90–day period for filing a Tax Court petition, after the issuance of the statutory notice of deficiency, is suspended for the time you are prevented from filing the petition because of the bankruptcy case, and for 60 days thereafter. However, even if the statutory notice was issued before the bankruptcy petition was filed, the suspension exists if any part of the 90–day period remained at the date the bankruptcy petition was filed.

Trustee may intervene. The trustee of your bankruptcy estate in any title 11 bankruptcy case may intervene, on behalf of the estate, in any proceeding in the U.S. Tax Court to which you are a party.

Tax assessment. Generally, the automatic stay rules prevent a creditor from taking actions to collect prepetition debts. However, the automatic stay does not apply to:

  1. An audit to determine tax liability,
  2. A demand for tax returns,
  3. The issuance of a notice of deficiency to the debtor, or
  4. The making of an assessment for any tax and the sending of a notice and demand for payment of the tax assessed (for bankruptcy cases filed after October 22, 1994).

Any tax lien that attaches to the estate’s property because of an assessment described above can only take effect when the property (or its proceeds) are transferred back to the debtor. Also, the tax must be the debtor’s debt that will not be discharged in the case.

Disclosure of return information. In bankruptcy cases other than those of individuals filing under chapter 7 or 11, and in receivership proceedings where substantially all the debt-or’s property is in the hands of the receiver, current and earlier returns of the debtor are, upon written request, open to inspection by or disclosure to the trustee or receiver, but only if the Internal Revenue Service finds that the trustee or receiver has a material interest which will be affected by information on the return.