To call for a review of an IRS decision or proposed adjustment.

Source: Internal Revenue Service

A request made after a trial by a party that has lost on one or more issues that a higher court review the decision to determine if it was correct. To make such a request is "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." One who appeals is called the "appellant;" the other party is the "appellee."

Source: U.S. Courts

A proceeding brought to a higher court to review a lower court decision.

Source: U.S. Courts

An appeal is a special kind of complaint you make if you disagree with a decision to deny a request for health care services or payment for services you already received. You may also make a complaint if you disagree with a decision to stop services that you are receiving. For example, you may ask for an appeal if Medicare doesn't pay for an item or service you think you should be able to get. There is a specific process that your Medicare Advantage Plan or the Original Medicare Plan must use when you ask for an appeal.


When someone that loses at least part of a case asks a higher court (called an "appellate court") to review the decision and say if it was right. This is called "to appeal" or "to take an appeal." The person that appeals is called the "appellant." The other person is called the "appellee."

Source: California Courts.